Tobacco-High Risk For Cancer, Stroke, Lung Diseases and most Non-Communicable Diseases.

Tobacco-High Risk For Cancer, Stroke, Lung Diseases and most Non-Communicable Diseases.

Key facts

Tobacco kills up to half of its users.
Tobacco kills nearly 6 million people each year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600 000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke. Unless urgent action is taken, the annual death toll could rise to more than eight million by 2030.
Nearly 80% of the world’s one billion smokers live in low- and middle-income countries.
Leading cause of death, illness and impoverishment

The tobacco epidemic is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced, killing nearly six million people a year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600 000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke. Approximately one person dies every six seconds due to tobacco, accounting for one in 10 adult deaths. Up to half of current users will eventually die of a tobacco-related disease.

Nearly 80% of the more than one billion smokers worldwide live in low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of tobacco-related illness and death is heaviest.

Tobacco users who die prematurely deprive their families of income, raise the cost of health care and hinder economic development.

In some countries, children from poor households are frequently employed in tobacco farming to provide family income. These children are especially vulnerable to “green tobacco sickness”, which is caused by the nicotine that is absorbed through the skin from the handling of wet tobacco leaves.

Gradual killer

Because there is a lag of several years between when people start using tobacco and when their health suffers, the epidemic of tobacco-related disease and death has just begun.

Tobacco caused 100 million deaths in the 20th century. If current trends continue, it may cause one billion deaths in the 21st century.

Unchecked, tobacco-related deaths will increase to more than eight million per year by 2030. More than 80% of those deaths will be in low- and middle-income countries.

Surveillance is key

Good monitoring tracks the extent and character of the tobacco epidemic and indicates how best to tailor policies. Only one in four countries, representing just over a third of the world’s population, monitor tobacco use by repeating nationally representative youth and adult surveys at least once every five years.

Second-hand smoke kills

Second-hand smoke is the smoke that fills restaurants, offices or other enclosed spaces when people burn tobacco products such as cigarettes, bidis and water pipes. There are more than 4000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, of which at least 250 are known to be harmful and more than 50 are known to cause cancer.

There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke.

In adults, second-hand smoke causes serious cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, including coronary heart disease and lung cancer. In infants, it causes sudden death. In pregnant women, it causes low birth weight.
Almost half of children regularly breathe air polluted by tobacco smoke in public places.
Over 40% of children have at least one smoking parent.
Second-hand smoke causes more than 600 000 premature deaths per year.
In 2004, children accounted for 28% of the deaths attributable to second-hand smoke.
Every person should be able to breathe tobacco-smoke-free air. Smoke-free laws protect the health of non-smokers, are popular, do not harm business and encourage smokers to quit.

Over 1 billion people, or 16% of the world’s population, are protected by comprehensive national smoke-free laws.

Tobacco users need help to quit

Studies show that few people understand the specific health risks of tobacco use. For example, a 2009 survey in China revealed that only 38% of smokers knew that smoking causes coronary heart disease and only 27% knew that it causes stroke.

Among smokers who are aware of the dangers of tobacco, most want to quit. Counselling and medication can more than double the chance that a smoker who tries to quit will succeed.

National comprehensive cessation services with full or partial cost-coverage are available to assist tobacco users to quit in only 21 countries, representing 15% of the world’s population.

There is no cessation assistance of any kind in one-quarter of low-income countries.

Picture warnings work

Hard-hitting anti-tobacco advertisements and graphic pack warnings – especially those that include pictures – reduce the number of children who begin smoking and increase the number of smokers who quit.

Graphic warnings can persuade smokers to protect the health of non-smokers by smoking less inside the home and avoiding smoking near children. Studies carried out after the implementation of pictorial package warnings in Brazil, Canada, Singapore and Thailand consistently show that pictorial warnings significantly increase people’s awareness of the harms of tobacco use.

Just 30 countries, representing 14% of the world’s population, meet the best practice for pictorial warnings, which includes the warnings in the local language and cover an average of at least half of the front and back of cigarette packs. Most of these countries are low- or middle-income countries.

Mass media campaigns can also reduce tobacco consumption, by influencing people to protect non-smokers and convincing youths to stop using tobacco.

Over half of the world’s population live in the 37 countries that have implemented at least one strong anti-tobacco mass media campaign within the last two years.

Ad bans lower consumption

Bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship can reduce tobacco consumption.

A comprehensive ban on all tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship could decrease tobacco consumption by an average of about 7%, with some countries experiencing a decline in consumption of up to 16%.
Only 24 countries, representing 10% of the world’s population, have completely banned all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.
Around one country in three has minimal or no restrictions at all on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.
Taxes discourage tobacco use

Tobacco taxes are the most cost-effective way to reduce tobacco use, especially among young people and poor people. A tax increase that increases tobacco prices by 10% decreases tobacco consumption by about 4% in high-income countries and about 5% in low- and middle-income countries.

Even so, high tobacco taxes is a measure that is rarely used. Only 32 countries, less than 8% of the world’s population, have tobacco tax rates greater than 75% of the retail price. Tobacco tax revenues are on average 175 times higher than spending on tobacco control, based on available data.

Illicit trade of tobacco products must be stopped

The illicit trade of tobacco products poses major health, economic and security concerns around the world. It is estimated that one in every 10 cigarettes and tobacco products consumed globally are illicit. The illicit market is supported by various players, ranging from petty peddlers to organized criminal networks involved in arms and human trafficking.

Eliminating illicit trade in tobacco will reduce the harmful consumption of tobacco by restricting availability of cheap, unregulated alternatives and increasing overall tobacco prices. Critically, this will reduce premature deaths from tobacco use and raise tax revenue for governments. Stopping illicit trade in tobacco products is a health priority, and it is achievable. But to do so requires improvement of national and sub-national tax administration systems and international collaboration, such as ratification and implementation of the Protocol to Eliminate the Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products, an international treaty in its own right, negotiated by parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC).

While publicly stating its support for action against the illicit trade, the tobacco industry’s behind-the-scenes behaviour has been very different. Internal industry documents released as a result of court cases demonstrate that the tobacco industry has actively fostered the illicit trade globally. It also works to block implementation of tobacco control measures, like tax increases and pictorial health warnings, by misleadingly arguing they will fuel the illicit trade.

WHO response

Tobacco kills up to half of its users.
Tobacco kills nearly 6 million people each year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600 000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke. Unless urgent action is taken, the annual death toll could rise to more than eight million by 2030.
Nearly 80% of the world’s one billion smokers live in low- and middle-income countries.
Leading cause of death, illness and impoverishment

The tobacco epidemic is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced, killing nearly six million people a year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600 000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke. Approximately one person dies every six seconds due to tobacco, accounting for one in 10 adult deaths. Up to half of current users will eventually die of a tobacco-related disease.

Nearly 80% of the more than one billion smokers worldwide live in low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of tobacco-related illness and death is heaviest.

Tobacco users who die prematurely deprive their families of income, raise the cost of health care and hinder economic development.

In some countries, children from poor households are frequently employed in tobacco farming to provide family income. These children are especially vulnerable to “green tobacco sickness”, which is caused by the nicotine that is absorbed through the skin from the handling of wet tobacco leaves.

Gradual killer

Because there is a lag of several years between when people start using tobacco and when their health suffers, the epidemic of tobacco-related disease and death has just begun.

Tobacco caused 100 million deaths in the 20th century. If current trends continue, it may cause one billion deaths in the 21st century.

Unchecked, tobacco-related deaths will increase to more than eight million per year by 2030. More than 80% of those deaths will be in low- and middle-income countries.

Surveillance is key

Good monitoring tracks the extent and character of the tobacco epidemic and indicates how best to tailor policies. Only one in four countries, representing just over a third of the world’s population, monitor tobacco use by repeating nationally representative youth and adult surveys at least once every five years.

Second-hand smoke kills

Second-hand smoke is the smoke that fills restaurants, offices or other enclosed spaces when people burn tobacco products such as cigarettes, bidis and water pipes. There are more than 4000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, of which at least 250 are known to be harmful and more than 50 are known to cause cancer.

There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke.

In adults, second-hand smoke causes serious cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, including coronary heart disease and lung cancer. In infants, it causes sudden death. In pregnant women, it causes low birth weight.
Almost half of children regularly breathe air polluted by tobacco smoke in public places.
Over 40% of children have at least one smoking parent.
Second-hand smoke causes more than 600 000 premature deaths per year.
In 2004, children accounted for 28% of the deaths attributable to second-hand smoke.
Every person should be able to breathe tobacco-smoke-free air. Smoke-free laws protect the health of non-smokers, are popular, do not harm business and encourage smokers to quit.

Over 1 billion people, or 16% of the world’s population, are protected by comprehensive national smoke-free laws.

Tobacco users need help to quit

Studies show that few people understand the specific health risks of tobacco use. For example, a 2009 survey in China revealed that only 38% of smokers knew that smoking causes coronary heart disease and only 27% knew that it causes stroke.

Among smokers who are aware of the dangers of tobacco, most want to quit. Counselling and medication can more than double the chance that a smoker who tries to quit will succeed.

National comprehensive cessation services with full or partial cost-coverage are available to assist tobacco users to quit in only 21 countries, representing 15% of the world’s population.

There is no cessation assistance of any kind in one-quarter of low-income countries.

Picture warnings work

Hard-hitting anti-tobacco advertisements and graphic pack warnings – especially those that include pictures – reduce the number of children who begin smoking and increase the number of smokers who quit.

Graphic warnings can persuade smokers to protect the health of non-smokers by smoking less inside the home and avoiding smoking near children. Studies carried out after the implementation of pictorial package warnings in Brazil, Canada, Singapore and Thailand consistently show that pictorial warnings significantly increase people’s awareness of the harms of tobacco use.

Just 30 countries, representing 14% of the world’s population, meet the best practice for pictorial warnings, which includes the warnings in the local language and cover an average of at least half of the front and back of cigarette packs. Most of these countries are low- or middle-income countries.

Mass media campaigns can also reduce tobacco consumption, by influencing people to protect non-smokers and convincing youths to stop using tobacco.

Over half of the world’s population live in the 37 countries that have implemented at least one strong anti-tobacco mass media campaign within the last two years.

Ad bans lower consumption

Bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship can reduce tobacco consumption.

A comprehensive ban on all tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship could decrease tobacco consumption by an average of about 7%, with some countries experiencing a decline in consumption of up to 16%.
Only 24 countries, representing 10% of the world’s population, have completely banned all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.
Around one country in three has minimal or no restrictions at all on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.
Taxes discourage tobacco use

Tobacco taxes are the most cost-effective way to reduce tobacco use, especially among young people and poor people. A tax increase that increases tobacco prices by 10% decreases tobacco consumption by about 4% in high-income countries and about 5% in low- and middle-income countries.

Even so, high tobacco taxes is a measure that is rarely used. Only 32 countries, less than 8% of the world’s population, have tobacco tax rates greater than 75% of the retail price. Tobacco tax revenues are on average 175 times higher than spending on tobacco control, based on available data.

Illicit trade of tobacco products must be stopped

The illicit trade of tobacco products poses major health, economic and security concerns around the world. It is estimated that one in every 10 cigarettes and tobacco products consumed globally are illicit. The illicit market is supported by various players, ranging from petty peddlers to organized criminal networks involved in arms and human trafficking.

Eliminating illicit trade in tobacco will reduce the harmful consumption of tobacco by restricting availability of cheap, unregulated alternatives and increasing overall tobacco prices. Critically, this will reduce premature deaths from tobacco use and raise tax revenue for governments. Stopping illicit trade in tobacco products is a health priority, and it is achievable. But to do so requires improvement of national and sub-national tax administration systems and international collaboration, such as ratification and implementation of the Protocol to Eliminate the Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products, an international treaty in its own right, negotiated by parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC).

While publicly stating its support for action against the illicit trade, the tobacco industry’s behind-the-scenes behaviour has been very different. Internal industry documents released as a result of court cases demonstrate that the tobacco industry has actively fostered the illicit trade globally. It also works to block implementation of tobacco control measures, like tax increases and pictorial health warnings, by misleadingly arguing they will fuel the illicit trade.

#MaterialsCredit : WHO

yomiaoko@gmail.com

Related Posts
Comments ( 35 )
  1. sdorttuii plmnr
    June 15, 2015 at 9:32 pm

    Spot on with this write-up, I actually suppose this web site wants rather more consideration. I’ll probably be again to learn much more, thanks for that info.

  2. GitaIErtel
    June 18, 2015 at 5:59 pm

    It is perfect time to make some plans for the future and it is time to be happy.

    I’ve read this post and if I could I want to suggest you few interesting things or tips.
    Maybe you could write next articles referring to this article.
    I want to read even more things about it!

  3. http://www.getjealous.com/handymanguru81/journal/3994052/hardwood-flooring-greenville-sc-getting.html
    June 22, 2015 at 8:14 pm

    Your understanding of this subject is impressive.
    It truly touched me and I’m happy I discovered this content.
    Thanks to you.

    • yomiaoko@gmail.com
      June 22, 2015 at 10:47 pm

      Thank you

  4. http://tamikaellzey29.bligoo.com
    June 23, 2015 at 12:06 am

    This is really fascinating, you’re a very professional blogger.
    I’ve joined your rss feed as well as sit up for trying to find more of
    your excellent post.In addition, I have shared your site in my social networks!

  5. http://josefinasherer597.postbit.com/
    June 23, 2015 at 1:57 am

    I like this site a lot, It’s truly good to read and also learn more information.

  6. New Mercurial 9
    June 23, 2015 at 12:10 pm

    i like it,thanks for share

    • yomiaoko@gmail.com
      June 23, 2015 at 12:16 pm

      Thanks

  7. clash of clans hack
    June 24, 2015 at 2:04 pm

    It’s in reality a nice and useful piece of information. I’m
    satisfied that you shared this helpful information with us.
    Please stay us up to date like this. Thanks for sharing.

    • yomiaoko@gmail.com
      June 24, 2015 at 4:35 pm

      Ok I will. Really nice you had a good time here.

  8. http://kgpwinona.buzznet.com/user/journal/24468981/great-fitness-suggest-will-bring/
    June 26, 2015 at 3:30 am

    Nice to be visiting your blog once more. Great this post.
    Thank you for sharing.

  9. plumber in waltham ma
    June 27, 2015 at 2:55 am

    Good post, I think webmasters ought to learn a lot from this web blog its user-friendly and posts are
    great.

  10. www.buildzoom.com
    June 27, 2015 at 6:50 pm

    We appreciate you sharing superb informations. Your website is very cool.
    I’m stunned at the details that you’ve put on this site.
    It unveils how nicely you recognize this subject.
    Bookmarked this web page, will keep coming back for a lot
    more articles. You, amigo, ROCK! I found simply the information I already searched all over the place and simply couldn’t run into.
    What an ideal website.

  11. http://madiehand.buzznet.com/
    June 28, 2015 at 2:11 am

    Hi i just been to your website for the first time
    and i certainly enjoyed it, i bookmarked it and will be
    back.

  12. chauncey2101.wordpress.com
    June 28, 2015 at 5:29 am

    I saw your post a while back and saved it to my computer. Only lately have I got
    a opportunity to check it and I have to tell you good work.really very good post,
    i definitely enjoy this website, thanks.

  13. does gynexin work.
    June 28, 2015 at 7:43 am

    Hi there just wanted to give you a quick heads up and let you know a few of the
    images aren’t loading correctly. I’m not sure
    why but I think its a linking issue. I’ve tried it in two
    different internet browsers and both show the
    same results.

  14. Littmann Cardiology III
    June 28, 2015 at 8:27 am

    Hey There. I found your weblog the use of msn. That is a very neatly written article.

    I will be sure to bookmark it and come back to read
    extra of your helpful info. Thanks for the post.
    I’ll definitely comeback.

  15. Velma
    June 28, 2015 at 1:03 pm

    What’s up friends, how is everything, and what you would like to say regarding this post,
    in my view its genuinely amazing in favor of me.

  16. tsohost promotional code
    June 28, 2015 at 1:59 pm

    I can’t fault them.

  17. http://mirandaruddell67.bligoo.com/force-your-organization-to-the-top-level-with-these-seo-recommendations
    June 28, 2015 at 6:18 pm

    Really nice post. I just stumbled upon your
    weblog and wished to say that I have actually loved surfing around your
    blogs. In any case I’ll be signing up to your feed and I hope you write once more soon!

  18. what is the cause of obesity
    June 28, 2015 at 7:59 pm

    The other day, while I was at work, my sister stole my apple ipad and tested to see
    if it can survive a thirty foot drop, just so she can be
    a youtube sensation. My apple ipad is now destroyed and she has 83 views.
    I know this is entirely off topic but I had to share it with
    someone!

  19. Vaser Lipo Cape Town
    June 28, 2015 at 9:41 pm

    I have been exploring for a little for any good quality articles
    or blog posts in this type of area . Exploring
    the web I ultimately came across this web site. Reading this content I’m glad to show that I have an incredibly good
    uncanny feeling that I discovered exactly what I needed.

  20. http://teatreeoilandlice86.bligoo.com/ways-you-can-overcome-acne-and-win
    June 29, 2015 at 1:42 am

    Thank you for this wonderful post, I am happy I found this site
    on the search engines.

  21. vancouver web design
    June 29, 2015 at 6:18 am

    The company pfovides excellent online search engine advertising
    and marketing wiith the aid of the Search Engine Optimization professionals.

  22. tsohost promotional code
    June 29, 2015 at 8:20 am

    If this is the case, verify this and answers over right here and right here to resolve it by increasing the limit.

  23. Hostgator Coupons September
    June 29, 2015 at 8:42 am

    This needs to be outside of the range of dynamic IP addresses.

    Does your location matter when subscribing for a hosting server.
    Usually among different modes of hosting a website,
    the VPS hosting is considered the best. For instance, a website selling adult materials
    could be hosted on the same server as a business selling
    children’s toys. Because of the scalable feature
    the required amount of space on these web hosting servers can be
    increased in accordance with the requirements of the users.
    You have a place where you can test your web
    projects, a place to store all the multimedia files
    that are played at network-enabled players in your home, and a
    separate machine to run a torrent client. The downside is that other people have
    access to your server. Through the phrase Virtual committed server Internet site
    hosting it is often obvious which the solitary actual hosting
    server is basically cut straight into a number of Virtual Private Servers after which accessible to
    consumers using tiny amount of info exchange, Memory as properly as disk space.
    1, the precise Microsoft and also Milliseconds ASP.
    If the resources are throttled, only the
    targeted website goes down, without affecting the others.

  24. Plantar Fasciitis Shoes
    June 29, 2015 at 8:54 am

    I am not positive the place you are getting your information, however good topic.

    I needs to spend some time finding out more or understanding more.

    Thanks for fantastic info I was in search of this info for
    my mission.

  25. https://elizbethkey25.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/article-marketing-to-boost-your-small-business-suggestions-and-techniques
    June 30, 2015 at 3:45 pm

    Excellent post, I think website owners ought to learn lots from this blog site its truly user-friendly.

  26. theresaadam0213.wordpress.com
    June 30, 2015 at 6:10 pm

    I added this article to my favorites and plan to return to for more outstanding posts.
    It’s easy to read and comprehend and also intelligent post.
    I definitely enjoyed my first read all through this post.

  27. Targeting Childhood Obesity With Active Healthy Lifestyle Programs and Diet. | Ageless Physiotherapy Clinic
    July 1, 2015 at 9:25 am

    […] Also Read : Tobacco-High Risk For Cancer, Stroke, Lung Diseases and most Non-Communicable Diseases. […]

  28. Google
    July 1, 2015 at 1:26 pm

    Please stop by the web pages we comply with, such as this one particular, because it represents our picks from the web.

  29. www.ajanspiya.com
    July 2, 2015 at 3:49 am

    Oh my goodness! Awesome article dude! Thank you so much, However I am experiencing difficulties with your RSS.

    I don’t know why I can’t join it. Is there anyone else having similar RSS problems?
    Anyone that knows the solution can you kindly respond?

    Thanks!!

  30. Vaser Lipo
    July 2, 2015 at 8:23 am

    Please keep on posting these kinds of quality stories as this is an uncommon thing to find these days.
    I’m always looking online for blogposts which could help me.
    Looking forward to another wonderful website.
    Good luck!

  31. Del
    July 2, 2015 at 10:09 am

    Well written article! Excellent job, keep up.

  32. does tea tree oil help acne
    July 2, 2015 at 10:26 am

    I love this site it’s a masterpiece! Glad to uncover this on the internet.